Pro-Life Feminism

I’m a feminist and I’m against abortion by Erika Bachiochi: “Abortion expects nothing more of men, nothing more of medicine, and nothing more of society at large. Abortion betrays women by having us believe that we must become like men — that is, not pregnant — to achieve parity with them, professionally, socially, educationally. And if we are poor, overwhelmed or abandoned by the child’s father, or if medical expenses would be too great for us or for our child, social “responsibility” requires us to rid ourselves of our own offspring.”

Pro-life feminism is the future by Colleen Carroll Campbell: “For many American women, the feminism that once attracted them with its lofty goal of promoting respect for women’s dignity has morphed into something antithetical to that dignity: a movement that equates a woman’s liberation with her license to kill her unborn child, marginalizes people of faith if they support even modest restrictions on abortion, and colludes with a sexist culture eager to convince a woman in crisis that dealing with her unplanned pregnancy is her choice and, therefore, her problem.”

Beyond Abortion—A Common Good Feminism for the Twenty-First Century: “What are some issues that should take on increased importance for these common good feminists? While there are a myriad of possibilities, we hope to begin the conversation by focusing on just a few: reducing the abortion rate, improving conditions for working mothers, giving girls safe and affirming communities in which to grow up, and promoting human rights and economic development.”

Cheering for Change by Shannon Crounse: “Why am I pro-life? The fundamental reason is that I believe that at the moment of conception a unique life has been created. As a woman, I feel that it is a privilege to carry a new life. This may, at times, interfere with other plans we women have for our bodies and our own lives. Yet the unique life created inside us should not be punished or treated as inferior simply because it has not grown to its full potential yet”

The Feminist Case Against Abortion by Serrin Foster: “If you refuse to choose between women and children, if you work to systematically eliminate the root causes that drive women to abortion, then you already follow in the footsteps of Susan B. Anthony and our other feminist foremothers, whether you call yourself a feminist or not.”

Pro-Life Feminism by Liz Hoskings: “From the ‘pro-life’ feminist viewpoint, mainstream feminism has sold out to what is a masculine worldview. Instead of fighting for equality on their own terms, women have been forced into adapting themselves to a wombless, male world.”

Promoting a right to abortion keeps women from achieving full liberation by Marilyn Kopp: “Pro-choice women have abandoned core feminist values and adopted the worst patriarchal standards: seeking power through control and domination, condoning violence on the grounds of personal privacy, and using killing to resolve conflict.  By insisting on abortion as necessary for equality, we assume the traditional male world view: equating personhood to manhood, denying women’s reproductive capacities.”

I’m an anti-abortion feminist. I’ll walk at the Women’s March, whether organizers like it or not.: “We will fight against the modern popular feminist paradigm that says that to support women’s rights, we must support the violent act that is abortion. We will fight against the culture that understands pregnancy as a disease and sees children not for their inherent dignity, but for how wanted and able they are. We will stand up against misogyny, rape culture, sexual assault, sexism, racism, ageism, ableism and all discrimination. And yes, because of that, we will stand up against abortion.”

Can I be a feminist too? by Laura Nicholson: “Indeed I think part of feminism is transforming society so that procreation doesn’t affect women so disproportionately. We need better maternity leave and childcare options. We need to break down stigmas surrounding single, student, and working mothers. I’d love to live in a society where employers understand that supporting their pregnant and parenting employees means supporting productive citizens and healthy families. If our society had better support for pregnancy and child-rearing, I believe less women would feel compelled to choose abortion in the first place. But in any case, I reject the idea that only when women are able to have their offspring killed can we have the same opportunities as men.”

Why I’m a pro-life feminist by Claire Swinarski: “Hillary Clinton’s a mother, and she’s running for president. Adele’s a mother, and she released the biggest No. 1 single in three years in 2015. Madeleine Albright, J.K. Rowling: Mothers — successful, thriving mothers — are everywhere. Having children should not rob you of your identity or your purpose. Pro-life feminists believe it doesn’t have to.”

Abortion’s Not Liberating: “For me, feminism is pro-women, not pro-abortion. A woman facing an unwanted pregnancy often won’t experience abortion as a choice, but as the only option made available to her, by her partner, her financial situation, employer, landlord, parents, friends, school, you name it. As a feminist pro-lifer, I recognise the injustice of asking a woman to abort her child in order to participate fully in society. If women have to have abortions to maintain their careers, lifestyles and status, then they are still oppressed.”